Middle Market employers in Silicon Valley need to be familiar not only with the state minimum wage, but also any local minimum wage laws that may be applicable to them, and on July 1, a few cities, including San Jose, San Francisco and Emeryville, had new minimum wages go into effect:

City Minimum Wage
San Francisco $14 per hour
San Jose $12 per hour
Emeryville $14 per hour for employers with 55 or fewer employees; $15.20 per hour with 56 or more employees

California’s minimum wage rose earlier this year to $10.50 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees.  In recent years, however, many cities and counties have enacted their own minimum wage rules. Compliance with local ordinances can be complicated, because some ordinances apply only to businesses that are based in the city in question, while others apply to all employees who work some minimum number of hours in the city.

What Should Employers Do Now? Continue Reading Some Silicon Valley Cities Increased Minimum Wage on July 1

Employers in California, especially those in the Middle Market, are all too familiar with the tidal wave of wage and hour litigation they have confronted over the past decade plus – claims alleging misclassification, unpaid overtime, meal period and rest break violations, and pay stub violations, to name just a few.  A new decision from the California Supreme Court addresses claims based on long-ignored Labor Code statutes regarding days of rest.  Although the decision is favorable for employers in many respects, it nevertheless could foretell another species of wage and hour claim on the horizon.  In the wake of this decision, employers should consider adopting policies on days of rest and should be careful to avoid requiring non-exempt employees to work seven days within a single work week unless they work no more than 30 hours during the week and no more than six hours in any single day. Continue Reading California Supreme Court Clarifies Rules Regarding Days of Rest

Last fall, California voters approved Proposition 64, legalizing the recreational use of marijuana for persons 21 and older.  In the wake of Proposition 64’s passage, many employers have been puzzled about the impact of the new law upon their human resources practices.  The good news is that Proposition 64 should not have a substantial effect on employers.

Our firm recently sent out a client alert that goes into greater detail about what the new law does and doesn’t do. Continue Reading Dazed and Confused by Prop 64? Here’s What Employers Need to Know